Saturday, February 20, 2016

Community Service

As a graduation requirement, students at my high school must do community service at least one time a year for a fourth a credit for four years in the end adding up to one credit. For this year's community service my junior class is going send a different homeroom, junior class to a nursing home every Thursday, although I could be mistaken on that fact. Regardless, this past Thursday my homeroom loaded onto a bus and went to the rehabilitation center that is out by the Hospital whose name I do not know. However, before going we were given instructions last Friday, which was a half day, during the mentoring period about proper manners/action and what do expect. Thus when should go to the nursing home we would not just be "thrown to the wolves". When my class got to the nursing a man who was the husband of the social activity director or something along those lines. He stated that he was employed by the nursing home or rehabilitation center as a handy man in basic terms and gave us some basic information about the place. He then proceeded to give us a tour of the facilities and occasionally stopping in an area to explain something. Along the way we stopped at a physical therapy room and the nurses' station where the nurses there explained their job description and some background information like where they went to college to how long they had been working at this specific place. The last thing that we did before we left was play a game with some residents in a different groups. In my group we were paired with this lovely older couple, and we tried playing a variety of games from go-fish to the eventual Yahtzee. I personally had a blast because the couple were actually very funny (not because of the state of their condition) and did things like shake the die and blow on them before rolling and when the man jokingly accused someone of cheating the wife gently scolded him. I also felt like the couple were having a good time and enjoying the company.  Thus I would say that this community service project was very fun and successful and hopefully it continues to brighten the lives of the elderly.
Without Wax,
Chris S. 

Saturday, February 13, 2016

Spanish Poetry

This week in Spanish class we had the experience of being introduced to Spanish poetry, how to write it, and then writing it. To start, I would like to say that Spanish poetry is similar to English poetry in the sense that in Spanish, hoy rhymes with soy, and in English boy rhymes with toy. However, Spanish has a very different way of rhyming as well. In Spanish you are able to rhyme words based on if the last vowel sound that the word makes is the same for both words. For example, dinero, making its o sound thus rhymes with perro which also had the o sound. As a result many words in Spanish that look like they don't rhyme with a traditional English method actually do using the Spanish method and so many people in my Spanish class including me, have trouble rhyming in Spanish. In addition, our teacher is assigning us different types of poems to write ranging from a haiku to a ballad. This process of making Spanish poems is even hardened when certain types of poems that we right have to have a certain number of syllables per line. Overall, the process is very hard and difficult. To make matters worse, my Spanish class, that has a long history of being subordinated in small measures and overall resistant to Spanish has been hit in the face as our teacher has treated us harsher. These efforts are not unfounded, but overall makes the mood of the class worse. I personally still find the class enjoying, but now it is just a lot hard. In the end, however much I dislike doing Spanish poetry because of how hard it is, is overcome by the fact that by being able to create Spanish poetry helps me better understand the language as well as improve my vocabulary. Also, our teacher mentioned that she doesn't want us to hate poetry because of this despite that challenge, she wants us to be able to use it in a way that will positively affect our lives. Hopefully, Spanish poetry does both, and my class's conflict is resolved.
Without Wax,
Chris S.